PEEP SHOW .:May 06 09:.




- Argonaut

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FTW!!!!!!! .:May 06 09:.


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- JABAone

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o rly? .:May 06 09:.


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- JABAone

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Protect ya' neck! .:May 06 09:.


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- JABAone

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Ethics for Crate Digging .:May 05 09:.


I was doing some crate digging research on Sunday in the neighborhood and it dawned on me that there is an unspoken code of how to dig records...I was looking through a 'fresh' crate that had just been brought out for the public and was looking through it with some female friends when an older lady came up and started looking through the pile that I had been setting aside for evaluation. I told her that this was a pile I was previewing and she got a bit huffy and then pushed into the crate I was looking at. Now we all know that sharing is a value instilled in all of us since early youth but when it comes to sharing a crate with a stranger it can be awkward and probably considered rude to make that your imperative. Now my situation was that I was 2/3 of the way done looking through the crate and this older lady starts digging in rather intensely. I blew it off as whatever because my drive to find records is not as intense as it was in my past, but I could tell my female friends were ready to pounce on her. In the end we all scored well and we left happy.

But it got me thinking about crate digging interaction and I noticed a bunch of things that the older lady did wrong.

1. Being perceptive Survey the situation: Is the crate up for grabs? Is there anyone looking at the crate? Do the records seem accessible or should you wait until people are done looking?(Sometimes there are so many crates or records that physically there is space for a lot of people).

2. Courtesy  We all know that crate digging is likened to a race or a battle from time to time but is it worth possibly being rude by undermining others in your pursuit? Do you really need to get so close to another person to find what you are looking for? Once again in the past I may have pushed my way into finding things regardless but it seems a bit over-the-top nowadays.

3. Mentality Rethink why finding music is so important. In this day and age of Serato music is much more accessible on analog and digitally; the information is out there with a little research. Unless your JOB is to resell vinyl records(I only know a handful of people who only do this for a living) the intensity to find good music should be tempered. I will admit it can be a huge adrenaline rush and very satisfying to find selections but realize that there are vast amounts of other people trying to do the same thing and alienation is a short sided goal.

Well anyway peace from a good weekend of crate digging, don't stop looking for those gems...


- Existence 76

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Record Review: Suite for Ma Dukes .:May 05 09:.


So this is the our first Record Review, and because I would be the worst person to attempt to write a review, I have recruited a friend of mine who buys music as often as he eats to handle this one. I call him JJ, but he goes by "IX" as in the number 9.  - Jo_iLL


His legacy continues. By far, this is one of the most sophisticated tributes to the late great James "Dilla" Yancey. Miguel Atwood-Ferguson and Carlos Niño (from Dwight Trible & the Life Force Trio's Love Is the Answer) reinterpret select Dilla productions through chamber music. You read that right. It's that same ol' buttery and provocative melody, but translated into an arranged masterpiece, minus the drums. From the flutes to the horns and to the violins, each contribution still catches the pure essence of what made Dilla's beats sound nothing short of amazing.

If you ever get a chance to listen to the track, Antiquity, then take note of what Carlos Niño had to say about the recording from Mochilla's website:

"It is also important to note that there was a very mystical and musical rain that came through on the bassoon tracks for Antiquity. When we heard the rain, hitting the sky light of the main live room at Bomb Shelter, we were immediately drawn to it! Miguel commented, that it was Dilla, and we all agreed. When we played the music for Dilla’s mom Ma Dukes, and brought the rain to her attention, she also agreed that it was him. If you listen closely, you’ll hear it in the track!"

Those who were looking for more of those neck breaking beats might shy away from this, but if you can appreciate the effort put into it and the sheer amount of dedication that made us followers of Dilla's legacy, then you should do yourself a favor and pick up this gem. Four tracks of orchestrated goodness. Proceeds from this record will undoubtely go to Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey (Dilla's ma).

-IX

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